Changeset 9570


Ignore:
Timestamp:
May 22, 2008, 1:10:59 AM (11 years ago)
Author:
gz
Message:

Use &CCL; more consistently

Location:
trunk/source/doc/src
Files:
5 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • trunk/source/doc/src/about.xml

    r9387 r9570  
    1717    <para>&CCL; is a fast, mature, open source Common Lisp
    1818      implementation that runs on Linux, Mac OS X and BSD on either
    19       Intel x86-64 or PPC. Clozure CL was forked from Macintosh Common
     19      Intel x86-64 or PPC. &CCL; was forked from Macintosh Common
    2020      Lisp (MCL) in 1998 and the development has been entirely separate
    2121      since. Ports to IA32 and Windows are under development.</para>
     
    6969      <listitem><para>Robust and stable. Customers report that their
    7070      CPU-intensive, multi-threaded applications run for extended
    71       periods on Clozure CL without difficulty.</para></listitem>
     71      periods on &CCL; without difficulty.</para></listitem>
    7272      <listitem><para>Full native OS threads on all platforms. Threads
    7373      are automatically distributed across multiple cores. The API
  • trunk/source/doc/src/ffi.xml

    r8981 r9570  
    19881988  <!-- ******************************************  -->
    19891989  <sect1 id="Reading-Foreign-Names">
    1990     <title>Reading Foreign Names</title> <para>Clozure Common Lisp
     1990    <title>Reading Foreign Names</title> <para>&CCL;
    19911991      provides several reader macros to make it more convenient to
    19921992      handle foreign type, function, variable, and constant
     
    31143114        <title>Description</title>
    31153115       
    3116         <para>In Clozure CL 1.2 and later, the #&gt; reader macro reads
     3116        <para>In &CCL; 1.2 and later, the #&gt; reader macro reads
    31173117          the following text as a keyword, preserving the case of the
    31183118          text. For example:</para>
     
    37433743        <title>Description</title>
    37443744       
    3745         <para>In Clozure CL 1.2 and later, the <code>CCL:FREE</code>
     3745        <para>In &CCL; 1.2 and later, the <code>CCL:FREE</code>
    37463746          function invokes the foreign <code>free</code> function from
    37473747          the platform's standard C library to deallocate a block of
  • trunk/source/doc/src/install.xml

    r9387 r9570  
    131131
    132132  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    133   <sect1><title>Obtaining Clozure CL</title>
    134     <para>There two main ways to obtain Clozure CL.  For Mac OS X,
    135     there are disk images that can be used to install Clozure CL in
     133  <sect1><title>Obtaining &CCL;</title>
     134    <para>There two main ways to obtain &CCL;.  For Mac OS X,
     135    there are disk images that can be used to install &CCL; in
    136136    the usual Macintosh way. For other OSes, Subversion is the best
    137     way to obtain Clozure CL.  Mac OS X users can also use Subversion
     137    way to obtain &CCL;.  Mac OS X users can also use Subversion
    138138    if they prefer. Tarballs are available for those who prefer them,
    139139    but if you have Subversion installed, it is simpler and more
     
    144144    </para>
    145145
    146     <para> There are three popular ways to use Clozure CL: as a
     146    <para> There are three popular ways to use &CCL;: as a
    147147      stand-alone double-clickable application (Mac OS X only), as a
    148148      command-line application, or with EMACS and SLIME. The following
     
    152152    <sect2><title>The Mac Way</title>
    153153      <para>If you are using Mac OS X then you can install and use
    154          Clozure CL in the usual Macintosh way.  Download and mount a
     154         &CCL; in the usual Macintosh way.  Download and mount a
    155155         disk image, then drag Clozure CL to the Applications folder.
    156156         After that you can double-click the Clozure CL application to
     
    175175
    176176    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    177     <sect2><title>Getting Clozure CL with Subversion</title>
    178       <para>It is very easy to download, install, and build Clozure CL
     177    <sect2><title>Getting &CCL; with Subversion</title>
     178      <para>It is very easy to download, install, and build &CCL;
    179179      using Subversion. This is the preferred way to get either the
    180       latest, or a specific version of Clozure CL, unless you prefer
     180      latest, or a specific version of &CCL;, unless you prefer
    181181      the Mac Way.  Subversion is a source code control system that is
    182182      in wide usage.  Most modern OSes come with subversion
    183       pre-installed. A complete, buildable and runnable set of Clozure
    184       CL sources and binaries can be retrieved by doing one subversion
     183      pre-installed. A complete, buildable and runnable set of &CCL;
     184      sources and binaries can be retrieved by doing one subversion
    185185      checkout.</para>
    186186
     
    189189      <literal>ccl</literal> directory with runnable binaries, and a
    190190      complete set of buildable sources.  To get the bleeding edge
    191       Clozure CL for Darwin x8664, at the command line type:</para>
     191      &CCL; for Darwin x8664, at the command line type:</para>
    192192
    193193        <programlisting>
     
    196196        </programlisting>
    197197
    198         <para>To get the 1.2 version of Clozure CL type:</para>
     198        <para>To get the 1.2 version of &CCL; type:</para>
    199199        <programlisting>
    200200          <![CDATA[
     
    221221        all versions.</para>
    222222
    223         <para>Once the checkout is complete you can build Clozure CL by
     223        <para>Once the checkout is complete you can build &CCL; by
    224224        running the lisp kernel and executing
    225225        the <literal>rebuild-ccl</literal> function. For
     
    270270      one on your local disk.  Then edit the &CCL; shell script to set
    271271      the value of <varname>CCL_DEFAULT_DIRECTORY</varname> and start
    272       up the appropriate Clozure CL kernel. See <xref
     272      up the appropriate &CCL; kernel. See <xref
    273273      linkend="The-ccl-Shell-Script"/> for more information about the
    274274      &CCL; shell scripts.</para>
     
    278278  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    279279  <sect1><title>Command Line Set Up</title>
    280     <para>Sometimes it's convenient to use Clozure CL from a Unix
    281       shell command line.  This is especially true when using Clozure
    282       CL as a way to run Common Lisp utilities.</para>
     280    <para>Sometimes it's convenient to use &CCL; from a Unix
     281      shell command line.  This is especially true when using &CCL;
     282      as a way to run Common Lisp utilities.</para>
    283283
    284284    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
     
    364364      <para>Note that most people won't need both
    365365      <literal>ccl</literal> and <literal>ccl64</literal> scripts.
    366       You only need both if you sometimes run 32-bit Clozure CL and
    367       sometimes run 64-bit Clozure CL.  You can rename the script that
     366      You only need both if you sometimes run 32-bit &CCL; and
     367      sometimes run 64-bit &CCL;.  You can rename the script that
    368368      you use to whatever you want.  For example, if you are on a
    369       64-bit system, and you only use Clozure CL in 64-bit mode, then
    370       you can rename <literal>ccl64</literal> to
     369      64-bit system, and you only use &CCL; in 64-bit mode, then
     370      you can rename  literal>ccl64</literal> to
    371371      <literal>ccl</literal> so that you only need to type
    372372      "<literal>ccl</literal>" to run it.</para>
     
    439439  <sect1 id="Command-Line-Options">
    440440        <title>Command Line Options</title>
    441     <para>When using Clozure CL from the command line, the following
     441    <para>When using &CCL; from the command line, the following
    442442      options may be used to modify its behavior.  The exact set of
    443       Clozure CL command-line arguments may vary per platform and
     443      &CCL; command-line arguments may vary per platform and
    444444      slowly changes over time.  The current set of command line
    445445      options may be retrieved by using the
     
    450450              <literal>--help</literal>).  Provides a definitive (if
    451451              somewhat terse) summary of the command line options
    452               accepted by the Clozure CL implementation and then
     452              accepted by the &CCL; implementation and then
    453453              exits.</para>
    454454          </listitem>
     
    457457            <para><literal>-V</literal> (or
    458458              <literal>--version</literal>).  Prints the version of
    459               Clozure CL then exits.  The version string is the same value
     459              &CCL; then exits.  The version string is the same value
    460460              that is returned by
    461461              <function>LISP-APPLICATION-VERSION</function>.</para>
  • trunk/source/doc/src/streams.xml

    r8993 r9570  
    1717
    1818    <sect2><title>Stream External Encoding</title>
    19     <para>Clozure CL streams have an external-encoding attribute that
     19    <para>&CCL; streams have an external-encoding attribute that
    2020    may be read using
    2121    <function>STREAM-EXTERNAL-ENCODING</function> and set using <function>(SETF
  • trunk/source/doc/src/using.xml

    r9199 r9570  
    610610              anything.  It defaults to <literal>NIL</literal>.
    611611              There are two domains that have a pre-defined meaning in
    612               Clozure CL: <literal>:FILE</literal> indicates
     612              &CCL;: <literal>:FILE</literal> indicates
    613613              encoding for a file in the file system and
    614614              <literal>:SOCKET</literal> indicates i/o to/from a
     
    787787      indicate that the encoding is UTF-8.)</para>
    788788
    789       <para>Clozure CL writes a byte order mark as the first character
     789      <para>&CCL; writes a byte order mark as the first character
    790790      of a file or socket stream when the endianness of the character
    791       encoding is not explicit.  Clozure CL also expects a byte order
     791      encoding is not explicit.  &CCL; also expects a byte order
    792792      mark on input from streams where the endianness is not
    793793      explicit. If a byte order mark is missing from input data, that
     
    801801
    802802  <sect3><title><function>DESCRIBE-CHARACTER-ENCODINGS</function></title>
    803     <para>The set of character encodings supported by Clozure CL can be
     803    <para>The set of character encodings supported by &CCL; can be
    804804    retrieved by calling
    805805    <function>CCL:DESCRIBE-CHARACTER-ENCODINGS</function>.</para>
     
    861861       equivalents. Intended to support most characters used in most
    862862       Western European languages.</para>
    863        <para>Clozure CL uses ISO-8859-1 encoding for
     863       <para>&CCL; uses ISO-8859-1 encoding for
    864864       <varname>*TERMINAL-IO*</varname> and for all streams whose
    865865       EXTERNAL-FORMAT isn't explicitly specified.  The default for
     
    871871       points, where the first 128 code points are equivalent to
    872872       US-ASCII.  That should be pretty much equivalent to what
    873        earliers versions of Clozure CL did that only supported 8-bit characters,
     873       earliers versions of &CCL; did that only supported 8-bit characters,
    874874       but it may not be optimal for users working in a particular
    875875       locale.</para>
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