Changeset 9115


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Apr 9, 2008, 5:22:06 PM (11 years ago)
Author:
jaj
Message:

Cleanup installation documentation. Reduce the number of references to older versions of CCL, which few users will care about.

File:
1 edited

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  • trunk/source/doc/src/install.xml

    r9071 r9115  
    1515  <sect1><title>Releases and System Requirements</title>
    1616   
    17     <para>There are three active versions of &CCL;.  Version 1.0 was a
    18       stable release (released in late 2005); it is no longer under
    19       active development.  Version 1.1 has been under active
    20       development since shortly after 1.0 was released; it's been
    21       distributed as a series of development "snapshots" and CVS
    22       updates.  1.1 snapshots have introduced support for x86-64
    23       platforms, internal use of Unicode, and many other features, but
    24       have presented something of a moving target.  Version 1.2
    25       (released in early 2008) is intended to be a more stable release
    26       and provide a more predictable release schedule, and to make it
    27       a bit easier for users who wish to track the "bleeding edge" of
    28       development to do so.</para>
    29 
    30     <para>Version 1.0 is available for three platform configurations:</para>
    31     <itemizedlist>
    32       <listitem>
    33         <para>Linux on PowerPC (32-bit implementation)</para>
    34       </listitem>
    35       <listitem>
    36         <para>Mac OS X on PowerPC (32-bit implementation)</para>
    37       </listitem>
    38       <listitem>
    39         <para>Mac OS X on PowerPC (64-bit implementation)</para>
    40       </listitem>
    41     </itemizedlist>
    42 
    43     <para>Versions 1.1 and 1.2 are available for five platform
    44       configurations:</para>
     17    <para>Version 1.2 is the latest release of &CCL; as of April
     18    2008. It is intended to be a more stable release and follow a more
     19    regular release schedule than previous versions.  It is easier for
     20    users who wish to track the "bleeding edge" of development to do
     21    so.</para>
     22
     23   <para>Versions 1.2 is available for five platform
     24   configurations:</para>
    4525    <itemizedlist>
    4626      <listitem>
     
    6141    <para>A 64-bit version of &CCL; requires a 64-bit processor
    6242      running a 64-bit OS variant.</para>
    63    
     43     
    6444    <para>There are ongoing efforts to port &CCL; to the Windows
    6545      operating system and to 32-bit x86 processors.</para>
    6646   
    67    
    6847    <para>Additional platform-specific information is given in the
    6948      following subsections.</para>
    7049
     50    <para>Older versions are still available for downloading as
     51    tarballs.  Version 1.0 was a stable release released in late 2005.
     52    Version 1.1 was under active development until late 2007.  A final
     53    1.1 release was never made.  It was distributed as a series of
     54    development "snapshots" and CVS updates.  1.1 snapshots introduced
     55    support for x86-64 platforms, internal use of Unicode, and many
     56    other features, but were a moving target. </para>
     57
    7158    <sect2><title>LinuxPPC</title>
    7259     
    73       <para>&CCL; versions 1.0 and later run under relatively
    74         recent versions of LinuxPPC. All versions of &CCL; require
    75         version 2.2.13 (or later) of the Linux kernel and version
    76         2.1.3 (or later) of the GNU C library (glibc) at a bare
    77         minimum.</para>
     60      <para>&CCL; requires version 2.2.13 (or later) of the Linux
     61      kernel and version 2.1.3 (or later) of the GNU C library (glibc)
     62      at a bare minimum.</para>
    7863    </sect2>
    7964
    8065    <sect2><title>Linux X8664</title>
    8166
    82       <para>Version 1.1 and later of &CCL; runs on relatively recent
    83         Linux distributions for the x86-64 architecture.  It requires
    84         a Linux with Thread Local Storage support in the toolchain and
    85         standard libraries, and the New Posix Thread Library (NPTL).
    86         Fortunately, these features seem to be present in all current
    87         Linux distributions for x86-64, though there may be some
    88         problems with early Linux distributions for x86-64. Some GCC
    89         versions older than 4.0 on Linux have been known to have
    90         problems compiling some of the C code in the kernel; some very
    91         old Linux distributions don't follow the current ABI standards
    92         wrt segment register usage; some early Linux kernels for
    93         x86-64 had problems mapping large regions of the address
    94         space; and so on. It's difficult to enumerate exactly what
    95         versions of what Linux distributions have what problems.  A
    96         rule of thumb is that&mdash;because much of the development of
    97         &CCL; for x86-64 took place in that time frame&mdash;Linux
    98         distributions released earlier than early 2006 may have
    99         problems running &CCL;. </para>
    100     </sect2>
    101 
    102     <sect2><title>FreeBSD-amd64</title>
    103       <para>Versions 1.1 and later of &CCL; runs on FreeBSD on x86-64
    104         (FreeBSD releases generally call the platform "amd64").  &CCL;
    105         should run under FreeBSD 6.0 or later; as of this writing,
    106         FreeBSD 7.0 is about to be released and it may be necessary
    107         for FreeBSD 7 users to install the "compat6x" package in order
    108         to use a version of &CCL; built on FreeBSD 6.x.</para>
     67      <para>&CCL; runs on relatively recent Linux distributions for
     68      the x86-64 architecture.  It requires a Linux with Thread Local
     69      Storage support in the toolchain and standard libraries, and the
     70      New Posix Thread Library (NPTL).  Fortunately, these features
     71      seem to be present in all current Linux distributions for
     72      x86-64, though there may be some problems with early Linux
     73      distributions for x86-64. Some GCC versions older than 4.0 on
     74      Linux have been known to have problems compiling some of the C
     75      code in the kernel; some very old Linux distributions don't
     76      follow the current ABI standards wrt segment register usage;
     77      some early Linux kernels for x86-64 had problems mapping large
     78      regions of the address space; and so on. It's difficult to
     79      enumerate exactly what versions of what Linux distributions have
     80      what problems.  A rule of thumb is that&mdash;because much of
     81      the development of &CCL; for x86-64 took place in that time
     82      frame&mdash;Linux distributions released earlier than early 2006
     83      may have problems running &CCL;. </para>
     84    </sect2>
     85
     86    <sect2><title>FreeBSD-amd64</title> <para>&CCL; runs on FreeBSD on
     87    x86-64 (FreeBSD releases generally call the platform "amd64").
     88    &CCL; should run under FreeBSD 6.0 or later; as of this writing,
     89    FreeBSD 7.0 is about to be released and it may be necessary for
     90    FreeBSD 7 users to install the "compat6x" package in order to use
     91    a version of &CCL; built on FreeBSD 6.x.</para>
    10992    </sect2>
    11093
    11194    <sect2><title>DarwinPPC-MacOS-X</title>
    11295
    113       <para> &CCL; 1.0 runs on MacOS X versions 10.2, 10.3 and
    114         10.4 on the PowerPC.</para>
    115 
    116       <para>Current development on version 1.1 and later takes place
    117         under OS X versions 10.4 and 10.5 and requires at least
    118         version 10.3.9</para>
     96      <para> &CCL; runs under OS X versions 10.4 and 10.5 and requires
     97      at least version 10.3.9</para>
    11998
    12099      <para>The 64-bit DarwinPPC version of &CCL; requires
     
    130109    </sect2>
    131110
    132     <sect2><title>Darwinx8664-MacOS-X</title>
    133       <para>Versions 1.1 and later of &CCL; run on 64-bit DarwinX86
    134         (MacOS on Intel).</para>
     111    <sect2><title>Darwinx8664-MacOS-X</title> <para>&CCL; runs on
     112    64-bit DarwinX86 (Mac OS X on Intel).</para>
    135113
    136114      <para>&CCL; Darwinx8664/MacOS X requires a 64-bit processor.
     
    148126  <sect1><title>Obtaining Clozure CL</title>
    149127    <para>There two main ways to obtain Clozure CL.  For Mac OS X,
    150       there are disk images that can be used to install Clozure CL in
    151       the usual Macintosh way. For other OSes, Subversion is the best
    152       way to obtain Clozure CL, and Mac OS X users can also use
    153       Subversion if they prefer to. Tarballs are available for those
    154       who prefer them, but Subversion is simpler and more
    155       flexible.</para>
     128    there are disk images that can be used to install Clozure CL in
     129    the usual Macintosh way. For other OSes, Subversion is the best
     130    way to obtain Clozure CL.  Mac OS X users can also use Subversion
     131    if they prefer. Tarballs are available for those who prefer them,
     132    but if you have Subversion installed, it is simpler and more
     133    flexible to use Subversion than tarballs.  It is easier to keep up
     134    with the bleeding edge if you are using Subversion, since disk
     135    images and tarballs are generated much less frequently than
     136    changes to Subversion.
     137    </para>
    156138
    157139    <para> There are three popular ways to use Clozure CL: as a
     
    168150         <ulink url="ftp://clozure.com/pub/testing/"/> </para>
    169151
    170       <para>So that &CCL; can locate its source code (and for other
     152      <para>So that &CCL; can locate its source code, and for other
    171153        reasons explained in
    172         <xref linkend="Predefined-Logical-Hosts"/>) you should either put the
     154        <xref linkend="Predefined-Logical-Hosts"/>, you should either put the
    173155        <literal>ccl</literal> directory in the same directory as the
    174156        Clozure CL application, or else put the Clozure CL application
     
    186168    <sect2><title>Getting Clozure CL with Subversion</title>
    187169      <para>It is very easy to download, install, and build Clozure CL
    188         using Subversion. Unless you're using the Mac Way, this is the
    189         preferred way to get either the latest, or a specific version
    190         of Clozure CL.  Subversion is a source code control system
    191         that is in wide usage.  Most modern OSes come with subversion
    192         pre-installed. A complete, buildable and runnable set of
    193         Clozure CL sources and binaries can be retrieved by doing one
    194         subversion checkout.</para>
    195 
    196       <para>First, make sure that Subversion is installed on your
    197         system.  Bring up a command line shell and type:
     170      using Subversion. This is the preferred way to get either the
     171      latest, or a specific version of Clozure CL, unless you prefer
     172      the Mac Way.  Subversion is a source code control system that is
     173      in wide usage.  Most modern OSes come with subversion
     174      pre-installed. A complete, buildable and runnable set of Clozure
     175      CL sources and binaries can be retrieved by doing one subversion
     176      checkout.</para>
     177
     178
     179      <para>One subversion command will create a
     180      <literal>ccl</literal> directory with runnable binaries, and a
     181      complete set of buildable sources.  To get the bleeding edge
     182      Clozure CL for Darwin x8664, at the command line type:</para>
     183
     184        <programlisting>
     185          <![CDATA[
     186svn co http://svn.clozure.com/publicsvn/openmcl/trunk/darwinx8664/ccl]]>
     187        </programlisting>
     188
     189        <para>To get the 1.2 version of Clozure CL type:</para>
     190        <programlisting>
     191          <![CDATA[
     192svn co http://svn.clozure.com/publicsvn/openmcl/releases/1.2/darwinx8664/ccl]]>
     193        </programlisting>
     194
     195       
     196        <para>These examples fetch the complete sources and binaries
     197        for the Darwin X8664 build of &CCL;. You can fetch a different
     198        version by substituting its name in place of
     199        "darwinx8664". Current available versions are:</para>
     200
     201        <itemizedlist>
     202          <listitem><para>darwinppc</para></listitem>
     203          <listitem><para>darwinx8664</para></listitem>
     204          <listitem><para>freebsdx8664</para></listitem>
     205          <listitem><para>linuxppc</para></listitem>
     206          <listitem><para>linuxx8664</para></listitem>
     207        </itemizedlist>
     208
     209        <para>These distributions contain complete sources and
     210        binaries. They use Subversion's "externals" features to share
     211        common sources; the majority of source code is the same across
     212        all versions.</para>
     213
     214        <para>Once the checkout is complete you can build Clozure CL by
     215        running the lisp kernel and executing
     216        the <literal>rebuild-ccl</literal> function. For
     217        example:</para>
     218
     219        <programlisting>
     220          <![CDATA[
     221joe:ccl> ./dx86cl64
     222Welcome to Clozure Common Lisp Version 1.2  (DarwinX8664)!
     223? (rebuild-ccl :full t)
     224<lots of compilation output>
     225  ? (quit)
     226  joe:ccl>]]>
     227        </programlisting>
     228        <sect3 id="Checking-Subversion-Installation"><title>Checking Subversion Installation</title>
     229      <para>If <literal>svn co</literal> doesn't work, then make sure
     230      that Subversion is installed on your system.  Bring up a command
     231      line shell and type:
    198232        <programlisting>
    199233          <![CDATA[
     
    215249        obtaining and installing Subversion at
    216250        the <ulink url="http://subversion.tigris.org/project_packages.html">Subversion
    217         Packages page</ulink>.</para>
    218 
    219       <para>Create the directory where Clozure CL will live, <literal>cd</literal> to that directory, then type a Subversion checkout command.  For example:</para>
    220 
    221         <programlisting>
    222           <![CDATA[
    223 joe:~> mkdir ccl
    224 joe:~> cd ccl
    225 joe:ccl> svn co http://svn.clozure.com/publicsvn/openmcl/trunk/darwinx8664]]>
    226         </programlisting>
    227        
    228         <para>This example fetches the complete sources and binaries
    229         for the Darwin X8664 build of &CCL;. You can fetch a different
    230         version by substituting its name in place of
    231         "darwinx8664". Current available versions are:</para>
    232 
    233         <itemizedlist>
    234           <listitem><para>darwinppc</para></listitem>
    235           <listitem><para>darwinx8664</para></listitem>
    236           <listitem><para>freebsdx8664</para></listitem>
    237           <listitem><para>linuxppc</para></listitem>
    238           <listitem><para>linuxx8664</para></listitem>
    239         </itemizedlist>
    240 
    241         <para>These distributions contain complete sources and
    242         binaries. They use Subversion's "externals" features to share
    243         common sources; the majority of source code is the same across
    244         all versions.</para>
    245 
    246         <para>Once the checkout is complete you can build Clozure CL by
    247         running the lisp kernel and executing
    248         the <literal>rebuild-ccl</literal> function. For
    249         example:</para>
    250 
    251         <programlisting>
    252           <![CDATA[
    253 joe:ccl> ./dx86cl64
    254 Welcome to Clozure Common Lisp Version 1.2  (DarwinX8664)!
    255 ? (rebuild-ccl :full t)
    256 <lots of compilation output>
    257   ? (quit)
    258   joe:ccl>]]>
    259         </programlisting>
     251        Packages page</ulink>.</para></sect3>
     252
    260253    </sect2>
    261254
    262255    <sect2><title>Tarballs</title>
    263       <para>Tarballs are available at
    264                                          <ulink url="ftp://clozure.com/pub/testing/"/>.
    265                                          Download and extract one on
    266                                          your local disk.  Then edit
    267                                          the &CCL; shell script to set
    268                                          the value of
    269         <varname>CCL_DEFAULT_DIRECTORY</varname> and start up the
    270         appropriate Clozure CL kernel. See
    271         <xref linkend="The-ccl-Shell-Script"/> for more
    272         information about the &CCL; shell scripts.</para>
     256      <para>Tarballs are available at <ulink
     257      url="ftp://clozure.com/pub/testing/"/>.  Download and extract
     258      one on your local disk.  Then edit the &CCL; shell script to set
     259      the value of <varname>CCL_DEFAULT_DIRECTORY</varname> and start
     260      up the appropriate Clozure CL kernel. See <xref
     261      linkend="The-ccl-Shell-Script"/> for more information about the
     262      &CCL; shell scripts.</para>
    273263    </sect2>
    274264  </sect1>
     
    307297      <para>To use the script:</para>
    308298      <orderedlist>
     299        <listitem>
     300          <para>Copy the script to a directory that is on your
     301          <varname>PATH</varname>.  This is often
     302          <literal>/usr/local/bin</literal> or
     303          <literal>~/bin</literal>.  It is better to do this than to
     304          add <literal>ccl/scripts</literal> to your
     305          <varname>PATH</varname> since the script needs to be edited,
     306          it will show up as modified to Subversion.</para>
     307        </listitem>
    309308        <listitem>
    310309          <para>Edit the definition of
     
    346345          </warning></para>
    347346        </listitem>
    348         <listitem>
    349           <para>Install the shell script somewhere on your shell's
    350             search path, or add the location of the shell script to
    351             your <literal>PATH</literal> environment variable.</para>
    352         </listitem>
    353347      </orderedlist>
     348
     349      <para>Note that most people won't need both
     350      <literal>ccl</literal> and <literal>ccl64</literal> scripts.
     351      You only need both if you sometimes run 32-bit Clozure CL and
     352      sometimes run 64-bit Clozure CL.  You can rename the script that
     353      you use to whatever you want.  For example, if you are on a
     354      64-bit system, and you only use Clozure CL in 64-bit mode, then
     355      you can rename <literal>ccl64</literal> to
     356      <literal>ccl</literal> so that you only need to type
     357      "<literal>ccl</literal>" to run it.</para>
    354358
    355359      <para>Once this is done, it should be possible to invoke &CCL;
     
    358362      <programlisting>
    359363&gt; ccl [args ...]
    360 Welcome to &CCL; Version whatever (DarwinPPC32)!
     364Welcome to &CCL; Version 1.2 (DarwinPPC32)!
    361365?
    362366      </programlisting>
     367     
    363368      <para>The ccl shell script passes all of its arguments to the
    364         &CCL; kernel.  See <xref linkend="Invocation"/> for more
    365         information about these arguments.  When invoked this way, the
    366         Lisp should be able to initialize the
    367         <literal>"ccl:"</literal> logical host so that its
    368         translations refer to the <literal>"ccl"</literal>
    369         directory. To test this, you can call
    370         <literal>probe-file</literal> in &CCL;'s read-eval-print
    371         loop:</para>
     369      &CCL; kernel.  See <xref linkend="Invocation"/> for more
     370      information about these arguments.  When invoked this way, the
     371      Lisp should be able to initialize the <literal>"ccl:"</literal>
     372      logical host so that its translations refer to the
     373      <literal>"ccl"</literal> directory. To test this, you can call
     374      <literal>probe-file</literal> in &CCL;'s read-eval-print
     375      loop:</para>
    372376      <programlisting>
    373377? (probe-file "ccl:level-1;level-1.lisp")  ;returns the physical pathname of the file
     
    736740  <sect1 id="Example-Programs">
    737741    <title>Example Programs</title>
    738     <para>Beginning with release 0.9, a number (ok, a
    739       <emphasis>small</emphasis> number, at least initially) of
    740       example programs are distributed in the "ccl:examples;"
    741       directory of the source distribution. See the
    742       README-OPENMCL-EXAMPLES text file in that directory for
    743       information about prerequisites and usage.</para>
     742    <para>A number (ok, a <emphasis>small</emphasis> number), of
     743    example programs are distributed in the "ccl:examples;" directory
     744    of the source distribution. See the README-OPENMCL-EXAMPLES text
     745    file in that directory for information about prerequisites and
     746    usage.</para>
    744747    <para>Some of the example programs are derived from C examples
    745748      in textbooks, etc.; in those cases, the original author and work
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