Changeset 12330


Ignore:
Timestamp:
Jun 29, 2009, 7:22:23 PM (10 years ago)
Author:
rme
Message:

Minor updates, mainly an attempt to provide id attributes for most (if
not all) chapter, sect1, and sect2 tags.

Location:
trunk/source/doc/src
Files:
7 edited

Legend:

Unmodified
Added
Removed
  • trunk/source/doc/src/about.xml

    r9570 r12330  
    1010          ]>
    1111
    12 <chapter><title>About &CCL;</title>
     12<chapter id="about-ccl"><title>About &CCL;</title>
    1313 
    1414  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    15   <sect1><title>Introduction to &CCL;</title>
     15  <sect1 id="introduction-to-ccl"><title>Introduction to &CCL;</title>
    1616   
    1717    <para>&CCL; is a fast, mature, open source Common Lisp
  • trunk/source/doc/src/build.xml

    r11995 r12330  
    99          <!ENTITY CCL "Clozure CL">
    1010          ]>
    11 <chapter><title>Building &CCL; from its Source Code</title>
     11<chapter id="building-ccl-from-source"><title>Building &CCL; from its Source Code</title>
    1212  <anchor id="Building-CCL"/>
    1313  <para>&CCL;, like many other Lisp implementations, consists of a
  • trunk/source/doc/src/ffi.xml

    r12265 r12330  
    37563756        <para>
    37573757        An "ivector" is a one-dimensional array that's specialized to
    3758         a numeric or characater element type.
     3758        a numeric or character element type.
    37593759        </para>
    37603760        <para>
  • trunk/source/doc/src/gc.xml

    r12096 r12330  
    6363        <listitem>
    6464          <para>Most heap-allocated objects have very short lifetimes ("are
    65           ephemeral"): they become inaccessible soon after they&#39;re created.</para>
     65          ephemeral"): they become inaccessible soon after they're created.</para>
    6666        </listitem>
    6767
    6868        <listitem>
    69           <para>Most non-ephemeral objects have very long lifetimes: it&#39;s
     69          <para>Most non-ephemeral objects have very long lifetimes: it's
    7070          rarely productive for the GC to consider reclaiming them, since
    71           it&#39;s rarely able to do so. (An object that&#39;s survived a large
    72           number of GCs is likely to survive the next one. That&#39;s not always
    73           true of course, but it&#39;s a reasonable heuristic.)</para>
     71          it's rarely able to do so. (An object that has survived a large
     72          number of GCs is likely to survive the next one. That's not always
     73          true of course, but it's a reasonable heuristic.)</para>
    7474        </listitem>
    7575
    7676        <listitem>
    77           <para>It&#39;s relatively rare for an old object to be destructively
     77          <para>It's relatively rare for an old object to be destructively
    7878          modified (via SETF) so that it points to a new one, therefore most
    7979          references to newly-created objects can be found in the stacks and
    80           registers of active threads. It&#39;s not generally necessary to scan
     80          registers of active threads. It's not generally necessary to scan
    8181          the entire heap to find references to new objects (or to prove that
    82           such references don&#39;t exists), though it is necessary to keep
    83           track of the (hopefully exceptional) cases where old objects are
    84           modified to point at new ones.</para>
    85         </listitem>
    86       </orderedlist>
    87       <orderedlist continuation="restarts" inheritnum="ignore">
    88         <listitem>
    89           <para>Most heap-allocated objects have very short lifetimes ("are
    90           ephemeral"): they become inaccessible soon after they&#39;re created.</para>
    91         </listitem>
    92 
    93         <listitem>
    94           <para>Most non-ephemeral objects have very long lifetimes: it&#39;s
    95           rarely productive for the GC to consider reclaiming them, since
    96           it&#39;s rarely able to do so. (An object that&#39;s survived a large
    97           number of GCs is likely to survive the next one. That&#39;s not always
    98           true of course, but it&#39;s a reasonable heuristic.)</para>
    99         </listitem>
    100 
    101         <listitem>
    102           <para>It&#39;s relatively rare for an old object to be destructively
    103           modified (via SETF) so that it points to a new one, therefore most
    104           references to newly-created objects can be found in the stacks and
    105           registers of active threads. It&#39;s not generally necessary to scan
    106           the entire heap to find references to new objects (or to prove that
    107           such references don&#39;t exists), though it is necessary to keep
     82          such references don't exists), though it is necessary to keep
    10883          track of the (hopefully exceptional) cases where old objects are
    10984          modified to point at new ones.</para>
     
    443418        <refsynopsisdiv>
    444419          <synopsis>
    445             <function>lisp-heap-gc-threshold new-threshold</function>
     420            <function>set-lisp-heap-gc-threshold</function> new-threshold
    446421          </synopsis>
    447422        </refsynopsisdiv>
     
    452427          <variablelist>
    453428            <varlistentry>
    454               <term>new-value</term>
     429              <term>new-threshold</term>
    455430
    456431              <listitem>
  • trunk/source/doc/src/ide.xml

    r9898 r12330  
    1111          ]>
    1212
    13 <chapter><title>The &CCL; IDE</title>
     13<chapter id="ccl-ide"><title>The &CCL; IDE</title>
    1414 
    1515  <!-- ================================================================ -->
    16   <sect1><title>Introduction</title>
     16  <sect1 id="ccl-ide-introduction"><title>Introduction</title>
    1717   
    1818    <para>&CCL; ships with the complete source code for an integrated
     
    3434
    3535  <!-- ================================================================ -->
    36   <sect1><title>Building the IDE</title>
     36  <sect1 id="building-ccl-ide"><title>Building the IDE</title>
    3737   
    3838    <para>Building the &CCL; IDE is now a very simple
     
    8080
    8181  <!-- ================================================================ -->
    82   <sect1><title>Running the IDE</title>
     82  <sect1 id="running-ccl-ide"><title>Running the IDE</title>
    8383   
    8484    <para>After it has been built, you can run the "Clozure CL.app"
     
    9696
    9797  <!-- ================================================================ -->
    98   <sect1>
     98  <sect1 id="ccl-ide-features">
    9999    <title>IDE Features</title>
    100100
    101     <sect2>
     101    <sect2 id="ide-editor-windows">
    102102      <title>Editor Windows</title>
    103103      <para>You can open an editor window either by choosing Open from
     
    115115    </sect2>
    116116   
    117     <sect2>
     117    <sect2 id="ide-lisp-menu">
    118118      <title>The Lisp Menu</title>
    119119      <para>The Lisp menu provides several commands for interacting
     
    168168    </sect2>
    169169
    170     <sect2>
     170    <sect2 id="ide-tools-menu">
    171171      <title>The Tools Menu</title>
    172172      <para>The tools menu provides access to the Apropos and
     
    180180    </sect2>
    181181
    182     <sect2>
     182    <sect2 id="ide-inspector-window">
    183183      <title>The Inspector Window</title>
    184184      <anchor id="section_inspector_window"/>
     
    211211 
    212212  <!-- ================================================================ -->
    213   <sect1><title>IDE Sources</title>
     213  <sect1 id="ide-source-code"><title>IDE Sources</title>
    214214   
    215215    <para>&CCL; builds the IDE from sources in the "objc-bridge" and
     
    234234
    235235  <!-- ================================================================ -->
    236   <sect1><title>The Application Builder</title>
     236  <sect1 id="application-builder"><title>The Application Builder</title>
    237237    <anchor id="application_builder"/>
    238238    <para>One important feature of the IDE currently has no Cocoa user
     
    465465
    466466    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    467     <sect2>
     467    <sect2 id="running-the-application-builder-from-command-line">
    468468      <title>Running the Application Builder From the Command
    469469      Line</title>
  • trunk/source/doc/src/install.xml

    r11950 r12330  
    1111          ]>
    1212
    13 <chapter><title>Obtaining, Installing, and Running &CCL;</title>
     13<chapter id="installing"><title>Obtaining, Installing, and Running &CCL;</title>
    1414 
    1515  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    16   <sect1><title>Releases and System Requirements</title>
     16  <sect1 id="releases"><title>Releases and System Requirements</title>
    1717   
    1818    <para>Version 1.3 is the latest stable release of &CCL; as of April
     
    6060
    6161    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    62     <sect2><title>LinuxPPC</title>
     62    <sect2 id="linuxppc"><title>LinuxPPC</title>
    6363     
    6464      <para>&CCL; requires version 2.2.13 (or later) of the Linux
     
    6868
    6969    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    70     <sect2><title>Linux x86</title>
     70    <sect2 id="linuxx86"><title>Linux x86</title>
    7171   
    7272      <para>
     
    7979
    8080    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    81     <sect2><title>FreeBSD x86</title>
     81    <sect2 id="freebsdx86"><title>FreeBSD x86</title>
    8282    <para>&CCL; should run on
    8383    FreeBSD 6.x and 7.x.
     
    8787
    8888    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    89     <sect2><title>Mac OS X (ppc and x86)</title>
     89    <sect2 id="macosx"><title>Mac OS X (ppc and x86)</title>
    9090
    9191      <para> &CCL; runs under Mac OS X versions 10.4 and 10.5.
     
    110110
    111111  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    112   <sect1><title>Obtaining &CCL;</title>
     112  <sect1 id="obtaining-ccl"><title>Obtaining &CCL;</title>
    113113    <para>There two main ways to obtain &CCL;.  For Mac OS X,
    114114    there are disk images that can be used to install &CCL; in
     
    126126
    127127    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    128     <sect2><title>The Mac Way</title>
     128    <sect2 id="obtaining-the-mac-way"><title>The Mac Way</title>
    129129      <para>If you are using Mac OS X then you can install and use
    130130         &CCL; in the usual Macintosh way.  Download and mount a
     
    151151
    152152    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    153     <sect2><title>Getting &CCL; with Subversion</title>
     153    <sect2 id="obtaining-via-svn"><title>Getting &CCL; with Subversion</title>
    154154      <para>It is very easy to download, install, and build &CCL;
    155155      using Subversion. This is the preferred way to get either the
     
    263263
    264264    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    265     <sect2><title>Tarballs</title>
     265    <sect2 id="obtaining-via-tarballs"><title>Tarballs</title>
    266266      <para>Tarballs are available at <ulink
    267267      url="ftp://clozure.com/pub/release/1.3/"/>.  Download and extract
     
    275275
    276276  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    277   <sect1><title>Command Line Set Up</title>
     277  <sect1 id="command-line-setup"><title>Command Line Set Up</title>
    278278    <para>Sometimes it's convenient to use &CCL; from a Unix
    279279      shell command line.  This is especially true when using &CCL;
     
    676676
    677677    <!-- ***************************************************** -->
    678     <sect2><title>Installing SLIME</title>
     678    <sect2 id="installing-slime"><title>Installing SLIME</title>
    679679
    680680      <para>Once you have the "slime" folder described in the previous
  • trunk/source/doc/src/using.xml

    r11547 r12330  
    1010          ]>
    1111
    12 <chapter><title>Using &CCL;</title>
     12<chapter id="using-ccl"><title>Using &CCL;</title>
    1313 
    1414  <!-- ============================================================ -->
    15   <sect1><title>Introduction</title>
     15  <sect1 id="using-ccl-introduction"><title>Introduction</title>
    1616   
    1717    <para>The Common Lisp standard allows considerable latitude in the
     
    497497
    498498
    499   <sect2><title>Characters</title>
     499  <sect2 id="unicode-characters"><title>Characters</title>
    500500    <para>There is one <literal>CHARACTER</literal> type in &CCL;.
    501501    All <literal>CHARACTER</literal>s are
     
    11061106  <sect1 id="Pathanmes"><title>Pathnames</title>
    11071107
    1108     <sect2>
     1108    <sect2 id="pathname-tilde-expansion">
    11091109      <title>Pathname Expansion</title>
    11101110      <para>Leading tilde (~) characters in physical pathname namestrings
     
    11361136   
    11371137   
    1138     <sect2>
     1138    <sect2 id="pathnames-on-darwin">
    11391139      <title>OS X (Darwin)</title>
    11401140     
    11411141      <para>&CCL; assumes that pathname strings are decomposed UTF-8.</para>
    11421142    </sect2>
    1143     <sect2>
     1143    <sect2 id="pathnames-on-linux">
    11441144      <title>Linux</title>
    11451145     
     
    11471147        encoded according to the current locale.</para>
    11481148    </sect2>
    1149     <sect2>
     1149    <sect2 id="pathnames-on-freebsd">
    11501150      <title>FreeBSD</title>
    11511151     
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